Shaping the Future of Systems Engineering

image1

Speaker

 Garry Roedler, INCOSE President, Senior Fellow - Lockheed Martin, USA 

Abstract

  The expectations, characteristics, properties, and technical capabilities of our systems continue to evolve. Systems today are highly interconnected, interdependent, and complex. It is hard to find a relevant system that is a stand-alone system, not interconnected to other systems or interacting in some significant way with other systems. And the increases in the functionality of our systems, as well as the level of technology adoption, has continued to outpace our practices to fully harness the technology and technically manage the Systems and Systems of Systems to our greatest advantage. To manage future systems across their life cycles, we will need to evolve the systems designs, our engineering practices, and our workforce. Digital Engineering promises to be the fundamental capability that can enable decision makers to make well-informed decisions that consider numerous factors under various conditions and facilitate agility in the systems engineering practices throughout the life cycle. It can provide an integrated, digital, model-based engineering approach to drive a paradigm shift in the conceptualization, development, production, utilization, and support of systems to aid in addressing complexity, uncertainty and ongoing change in our systems. 

This presentation will look at our current situation and how our environment has changed, providing an understanding of the challenges we are facing with some examples using specific technology areas. It will then look at how the Future of Systems Engineering and the use of Digital Engineering as an enabler has been characterized in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) Systems Engineering Vision 2025. Finally, the presentation will provide a look at some of the work in progress to advance our processes, practices, and performance of Systems Engineering towards addressing those challenges 

About Speaker

  

Garry Roedler is a Senior Fellow and the Engineering Outreach Program Manager for Lockheed Martin, the President of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE), and the Vice-Chair of the National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Systems Engineering Division (SED). He has over 34 years of systems engineering (SE) experience that spans the full life cycle and includes technical leadership roles in both programs and business functions. He is also an INCOSE Fellow, holds systems engineering certification at the Expert Systems Engineering Professional (ESEP) level, and received the INCOSE Founders Award. Garry has held key leadership roles in several industry associations and standards development organizations, including editor of ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288, Systems Life Cycle Processes and several other standards; and key editor roles for the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (SEBoK) and the INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook. This unique set of roles has enabled Garry to influence the technical co-evolution and consistency of these key Systems Engineering and System of Systems resources.

Bridging the System Engineering & Model-Based Design Gulf

image2

Speaker

 Dr. Jon Friedman, Senior Industry Manager - MathWorks, USA 

Abstract

  In this talk, we present a workflow for system and software architectural modeling and analysis with a tight connection to Model-Based Design. Key takeaways: (1) Building a bridge between early architecture work and downstream design (2) Creating architecture models and extending the language through stereotypes and profiles (3) Analyzing architectures (4) Moving to design and implementation 

About Speaker

 Dr. Jon Friedman is a senior manager at MathWorks (US) in Industry Marketing.  Dr. Friedman leads a team of industry experts focused on helping leading companies in the AeroDef and Auto industries adopt Model-Based Design through sharing of best practices. He has authored over 50 papers and articles on modeling and Model-Based Design and also holds an MBA from the University of Michigan.

Autonomous Systems enabled by Physics based Simulation

image3

Speaker

Aubanel Monnier, SBU ACE Technical Director Asia, ANSYS.

Abstract

Autonomous systems primarily focus on achieving the desired objective by perceiving their world and deciding the moves independent of human intervention. This involves sensing the environment, computing and deciding on the path and executing the commands. Autonomous Systems find application in many areas including but not limited to, aerospace, rail, automobiles, industries and healthcare. The first challenge is to enable the perception of the environment. This can be facilitated by a number of different sensors. Data provided by these sensors should to be brought together thru fusion algorithms to create a virtual world. Sensor perception may be influenced by many factors such as their placement, environmental conditions such as brightness, fog, rain and electromagnetic radiations. It is one of the hardest challenge to foresee possible limitation in sensor perception. Physics based simulation can help model sensors, simulate their placement and also, simulate their environment to enable various design of experiments. The decision to navigate the path is another difficult challenge. This is enabled by Artificial Intelligence and machine learning. AI is unpredictable by design. We need to device software architecture such that there is a safety mechanism that will validate the unverified plans from AI. The execution part should be designed keeping in mind, safety and integrity of the system. A formal language based modeling approach not only helps in safe and deterministic software development but also conforms to ISO 26262 while reducing the time and cost of the development & verification of embedded controls. Safety and Cybersecurity are concerns for any connected system in this digital age. A systematic approach to perform safety and security analysis is another important concern for autonomous systems. In this session, we look into various aspects of autonomous systems development with physics based simulations

About Speaker

Aubanel MONNIER has been working with SCADE Systems and Software

product lines for over 18 years, starting as an R&D engineer at Esterel Technologies in 2001. He assumed different roles within the organization such as product management, member of Expert Group and Field Technical Manager for Asia and Russia. He successfully established product technical discipline across Asia region. Since 2012 he moved to ANSYS and currently, leads Asia technical team as Technical Director – SBU Asia. Aubanel is a French citizen who is currently based out of Shanghai. In his current role, he primarily works with ANSYS customers in the domains such as Aerospace, Automotive and Rail providing advises and guidance on system / software architecture, model based systems and software engineering, electrification & battery management, advanced driver assist systems (ADAS) and autonomous systems. He graduated from Ecole Polytechnique de l’Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis in 2001, holding an Engineering diploma in Electronics and Master’s degree in Physics.

AI-guided MODEL BASED methods for architecture exploration

image4

Speaker

 Juan de Bedout , Vice President - Advanced Technologies, Collins Aerospace, USA  

Abstract

Modern and next-generation aerospace systems are requiring increased levels of integration, hybridization and adaptation to meet market demands for improved fuel burn, emissions and operating cost.  Conventional MBSE and formal methods have proven to be effective and enabling tools for addressing the validation and verification of such complex systems.  Many times, however, these MBSE methods identify inherent flaws or shortcomings in the system (plant and control) architecture which can be impractical to rectify in the latter V&V stages of system development.  The historical approach for synthesizing complex system architectures has been limited to expert-based brainstorming, with selection driven by steady-state performance metrics. While this approach has been acceptable for mature systems, new complex system architectures generally disrupt conventional design rules and concepts of operation. Emerging model-based methods that leverage artificial intelligence and machine learning can play an important role in automating both the exploration and discovery of new system architectures as well as expanding evaluation to include optimization over multiple operating points, dynamic system configurations and supervisory control modes, enabling a previously unachievable level of design space coverage, architectural diversity, and early insight into an expanded set of dynamic performance drivers. Two real-world examples of these emerging methods will be presented in this talk. The first will focus on complex system-of-system architecture optimization and the second will focus on multifunctional component optimization.

About Speaker

 Juan de Bedout, Vice President, Central Engineering, Advanced Technologies & Effectiveness. The Advanced Systems & Technology manages strategic technologies that support two or more Strategic Business Units (SBUs) and coordinates IP protection strategies and technology roadmaps across the enterprise. The Engineering Excellence group is responsible for growing and maturing our Global Engineering Centers, coordinating the implementation of ACE, identifying and sharing best practices for managing technical risks, and managing the Engineering supplier strategy. With nearly 20 years of experience in positions of increasing responsibility with General Electric, Juan has a proven track record of driving impactful innovation. Prior to joining Collins Aerospace he served as Chief Technology Officer for GE’s Grid Solutions business, a joint venture with Alstom. He also worked for the Energy Connections business in GE, with functional responsibility for a global team of over 8,000 engineers with operations in 23 countries. Juan has Bachelor and Master of Science degrees and Ph.D in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. He’s also a seasoned conference speaker, multiple patent holder and contributing author to various industry publication 

Challenges in adopting MBSE for Automotive Industry

image5

Speaker

Rokas Bartkevicius -  Chief Solutions Architect, CATIA No Magic, Dassault Systemes,  

Lithuania

Abstract

 The Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) keyword is no longer known from conferences or papers only. Industry organizations are already building their experience on adopting the MBSE solution. Some of them develop and deploy MBSE at a department, some at unit, and some even at the organization level. They face a lot of common and individual challenges on their way to MBSE. Working with our clients from Automotive industry (like Renault-Nissan, Audi, Ford) which are currently developing and deploying MBSE solutions in their companies we have collected various approaches, different challenges, and experiences. This presentation will summarize them going through the main MBSE adoption phases: Definition, Development, and Deployment. We will focus on tool selection process, modeling method, tools customization & integration perspectives, deployment strategy, and effective communication importance

About Speaker

Rokas is chief solutions architect for software engineering, model-based systems engineering, with more than ten years of experience in software development. He has been with No Magic Europe since 2010. Rokas is currently focusing on establishing MBSE culture and deploying MBSE solution for the existing and potential clients. He has run trainings and consultancy sessions with companies such as Audi, BMW, Draper, Nokia Networks, Renault-Nissan, Nokia, Microsoft, Amadeus, Deutsche Post, SIEMENS, REWE, ZF, etc. Before joining No Magic, Rokas worked as a software engineer, system analyst, and project manager, where he actively contributed to process improvement activities and acted as a modeling evangelist. Rokas holds Master in Computer Science and is OMG Certified UML, SysML Professional and OMG Certified Expert in BPM.

Murphy was an Optimist

image6

Speaker

 Kevin R Driscoll, Fellow, Honeywell Aerospace, USA 

Abstract

The complexity of modern safety- and security- critical systems are typically dealt with using abstraction and specialization.  However, doing this creates niches of expertise where designers can’t have the breadth and depth of expertise nor the experience to be able to anticipate all the failure modes that need to be handled in their designs. Critical systems often have requirements for incredibly small probabilities of failure.  One often hears designers of critical systems say: "We have to tolerate all credible faults". However, the word "credible" in this assertion contrasts starkly with the word "incredibly" in the sentence before. In fact, there are faults and failures that most designers think can't happen which actually can and do happen with probabilities far greater than the requirements allow.  The well-known Murphy's Law states that: "If anything can go wrong, it will go wrong."  With critical systems, this law doesn't go far enough.  This talk with further explain the reason why designers, generally, are ill-equipped to created design that are fault and/or attack tolerant enough.  Examples of "incredible" but actually occurring failures will be given.  These will include a number of Byzantine faults, component transmogrifications, fault mode transformation (e.g. stuck-at faults that aren't so stuck), the dangers of self-inflicted shrapnel, component creation via emergent properties, "evaporating" software, the dangers of asynchrony and interrupts, how not to do linked-list insertion, troubleshooting a flash memory problem, and exhaustively tested software that still failed

About Speaker

  

Mr. Driscoll is a Fellow at Honeywell Labs with over 40 years’ experience in research and development for safety and security in real-time, distributed, and embedded computer systems.  This includes all aspects of software, hardware, and architecture design -- with emphasis on the latter.  He is a consultant to other Honeywell divisions and external customers in the areas of fault tolerance, fault avoidance, architectures, data networks, real-time encryption, embedded computers, testability and signal integrity.  He has been the electronic system architect for space vehicles, aircraft, ground, and unmanned underwater vehicles.  He has led the creation of several local area network standards and was the lead author of the FAA Handbook on data network selection.  He is a member of the IFIP Working Group 10.4 on Dependable Computing and Fault Tolerance, the world's leading organization of dependable computing researchers.  He has 50 patents and numerous publications covering safety and security designs.

Innovating for a Sustainable Future

Alan Harding

Speaker

 Alan Harding, Head of Information Systems Engineering, BAE Systems, UK 

Abstract

 The INCOSE Vision “A better world through a systems approach” is bold, altruistic and inclusive. As the global authority on systems engineering, INCOSE has the responsibility to show how systems approaches (both systems engineering and systems thinking) can be used to achieve this vision. Using the United Nations 2030 agenda for sustainable development as its backdrop this presentation will: explore what we mean by “a better world”; present a view of how INCOSE can fully embrace sustainable development; and challenge us all to innovate and take concrete steps to help us all progress towards a better world through a systems approach. The aim is to inform and challenge us as individual SE’s, organisations and members/ leaders in INCOSE  

About Speaker

 Alan is the Head of Information Systems Engineering with the BAE Systems - Air business in the UK, a Chartered Engineer, and a Fellow of the IET. He is the immediate past-President of INCOSE, and co-chair of the INCOSE systems of systems working group. He is a systems engineer with over thirty three years’ experience. Alan is a BAE Systems Global Engineering Fellow. Alan's specialist interest areas include systems-of-systems, competency development, sustainability, and diversity/inclusion. 

Spacecraft Systems Engineering Lessons Learnt

image7

Speaker

 P J V K S Prakash Rao , Deputy Director, SRQA/URSC ISRO

Abstract

  

The role of systems engineering in realization of complex space systems needs no elaboration. Among space systems, spacecraft have to be conceived, designed, realized and have to be in operation for life span ranging from 5 to 15 years. Unattended operation, harsh space environment, very low volume of production (sometimes single unit for a given mission) and interaction of various engineering disciplines are the distinct characteristics of spacecraft systems, which makes their realization very challenging. The demands of very high Reliability and Quality make the task more demanding. U R Rao Satellite centre of ISRO, has to date built and operationalized more than 100 spacecraft serving various application areas of Communication, Remote Sensing, Navigation, Scientific and Inter Planetary missions. The realized spacecraft mass varies from few Kgs to above 6 tons covering Nano satellites to huge state of the art spacecraft. Several lessons were learnt in the realization of these satellites covering various disciplines of system engineering like mission conception, design, realization, Test & Evaluation, production, project management and mission operations. Few of the lessons applicable to allied fields of system Engineering are captured by the speaker in this presentation and enumerated 

About Speaker

  

Mr Prakasha Rao P.J.V.K.S is currently working as Outstanding Scientist in UR Rao satellite centre, Bangalore and is designated as Deputy Director of Spacecraft Reliability and Quality Area. Earlier, to this he served as Project Director-GSAT-9 (South Asian Satellite), GSAT 17 and GSAT 18 communications satellites and also Project Director for GSAT 6 spacecraft which had flown the 6m Unfurlable antenna, the largest on board antenna built by ISRO.  After completion of his M.Tech in Electronic Instrumentation from REC – Warangal, he has joined ISRO Satellite Centre during May 1985 in Quality assurance Division and in his 34 years of experience at ISRO, Mr. Prakasha Rao has worked in diverse areas of Satellite Systems such as – Test & Evaluation of sensors / control systems / digital systems and power systems. He also contributed as Project Manager/Deputy Project Director (Product Assurance) for INSAT-2E/TES and IRS-P5 spacecraft, and Head - Parts, Materials and Process Division at ISAC. As a Member of Space Generation Task Group (SGTG) – a team of 52 members all over ISRO for planning of ISRO activities up to 2020 he was involved in the generation of report related to Organizational structure & Human Resource management, and is also a Member of ISRO Strategy Group (ISG).  Mr. Prakasha Rao is awarded ISRO merit award "In recognition of his meritorious contribution to Indian Space Programme" and is a National Governing Council member of “ISSE” Indian Society for Systems Engineering.